2006-07 Sculpture Competition

Tower Arch

Tower Arch

Artist: Carl Billingsley, Ayden, NC
Media: Steel 24" x 30" x 10'

My current sculpture is almost equally divided between large scale fabricated metal sculptures for public sites and smaller scale cast metal sculptures for more intimate spaces. My sculptures are made to be experienced in the fullness of the physical presence, in all kinds of weather, with all types of light, at dawn, dusk and in the heat at midday. No matter what I may hope that they "mean," nor what I might have intended to convey, they must stand and be understood by each viewer as a unique experience. My sculptures are "abstract" in the sense that, although we speak or write about love or fear or some other experience of human life, those words signify the experience but they can't describe the actual experience. Thus, my sculpture Tower Arch signifies the visual experience of seeing towers and arches, references the dynamic of such structures and joins the form of the two very different types of architecture/engineering into a new and unexpected structure which appears in our environment and is there waiting to be experienced.

Visit billingsleyatelier.com to learn more about Carl Billingsley.

Airheart

Airheart

Artist: John Dawes, Anderson, SC
Media: Steel, cypress, bronze 9' x 4' x 3'

I am a large-scale kinetic metal sculptor fascinated with overkill and the inner workings of things. I like heavy steel as opposed to light. I seem to include a sort of narrative humor. I enjoy the fact that my pieces dwarf me. I incorporate wheels into my pieces frequently because, to me, being a sculptor truly is like being in a carnival with all the elements of a traveling troupe. So, the pickup truck's wheels cannot be dismissed as trivial, but worshipped as life.

Tall Crown Form

Tall Crown Form

Artist: Jacob DeCola, Greensboro, NC
Media:
Location: Saltwater-washed steel, fabricated, 5.5' x 2' x 1'

I am a large-scale kinetic metal sculptor fascinated with overkill and the inner workings of things. I like heavy steel as opposed to light. I seem to include a sort of narrative humor. I enjoy the fact that my pieces dwarf me. I incorporate wheels into my pieces frequently because, to me, being a sculptor truly is like being in a carnival with all the elements of a traveling troupe. So, the pickup truck's wheels cannot be dismissed as trivial, but worshipped as life.

Maya II

Maya II

Artist: Jon Mehlferber, Bristol, VA
Media: Concrete, 11' x 10' x 2'

Sculpture in the form of a dwelling or house has some ten thousand years or more of tradition. Human beings tend to use the dwelling symbolically, as an expression of their desire to create a realm of order within the chaos of the world. Carl Jung's concepts of the collective unconscious and the archetype account for the almost universal occurrence and symbolic significance of the dwelling. All the various representations of the dwelling motif are archetypal symbols-symbols of the archetypes corresponding to the need for spatial order and protective shelter, which Jung calls the "mother" and the "self." In Jung's thought, the mother archetype is associated not only with the "good" qualities of protection, nurturing, and growth, but also with "evil" qualities, like secrecy, darkness, and suffocation (overprotection). The archetype of the self is the archetype of order and wholeness. In this context, the arrangement of concrete blocks that make up this work are not neutral geometric shapes, but protective containers, just as the walls of a house are protective or exclusive boundaries.

The Extraction of Arrows

The Extraction of Arrows

Artist: Catherine Murray, Johnson City, TN
Media: Bronze, 84" x 22" x 22"

An issue that informs my current work is that of the damage wrought by humans on the natural environment. Recent trips to northern Scotland, Iceland, and China have revealed not only the breathtaking beauty of these places, but also the brutality that was, and continues to be, involved in their settlement. Violence toward the environment is evidenced directly in the destruction of habitat and the imbalance of animal populations. I work with forms that are universal in symbolic resonance (the wheel, the figure, the mask) and with materials that express both strength and fragility.

Icarus

Icarus

Artist: Sandy Wilcox, Farmville, VA
Media: Steel and recycled plastic, 10' x 3" x 1.5'

My outdoor sculptures are intended to promote the experience of noticing forms and motifs in nature. The openness of their design allows them to co-exist with their environment without dominating it, encouraging a response to the entire visual scene. Icarus is made of steel and recycled plastic and was inspired by the numerous artistic interpretations of the Greek myth of the son of Daedalus. Icarus was trying to escape from Crete using wings made of wax and feathers, but when he flew too close to the sun, his wings melted, and he plunged into the sea. The vocabulary of my art often includes wings or leaf shapes, as well as circle, spheres, and spirals, and references to natural forms and life cycles.